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amazon molly asexual reproduction

02 12 2020

Our emails are made to shine in your inbox, with something fresh every morning, afternoon, and weekend. Over time, the all-female species of the Amazon molly, a freshwater fish native to the border region of Texas and Mexico, has figured out how to clone itself without any male DNA. It may be that the coming together of those two fish was something of a perfect storm of genes. Findings have suggested that the asexual molly has polymorphic MHC loci despite its clonal reproduction, yet these loci are more polymorphic in the sexual species. The Amazon molly has remained frozen in evolutionary time. Scientists recently sequenced the first Amazon molly genome and the genomes of the original parental species that created this unique fish. Sexual reproduction consists of two sets of DNA. “The expectation is that these asexual organisms are at a genetic disadvantage,” says Warren, who is also an assistant professor of genetics. Futurity is your source of research news from leading universities. The findings suggest that the molly’s thriving existence is not totally unexpected—the fish has a hardy genetic makeup that is often rare in nature and gives the animals some predicted survival benefits. © 2020 Quartz Media, Inc. All rights reserved. One of the theories that spells out why asexual reproduction should stand in the way of a species’ sustainability is the idea that if no new DNA is introduced during reproduction, then harmful gene mutations can accumulate over successive generations, leading to eventual extinction. In asexual reproduction, of which there are many types, all the offspring’s genetic material comes from a single parent. The Amazon molly—known technically as Poecilia formosa—is the sexual ancestor of two parent fish called Poecilia latipinna and Poecilia mexicana. The researchers expected that the asexual organism would be at a genetic disadvantage, but the Amazon molly is thriving. Scientists have long theorized that this form of sexual reproduction—called gynogenesis—would usher in extinction for the Amazon molly. This characteristic has led to the Amazon molly becoming an all-female species. The Amazon molly, Poecillia formosa, is a freshwater fish that is gynogenetic. Scientists believe animals and other living things that reproduce in this way aren’t equipped to survive the ravishes of new pathogens and other dangers that arise as environments change. The finding is forcing scientists to reconsider how they think about asexual reproduction. They don’t lay eggs but instead give birth to large broods of live offspring. The research was published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. The researchers found that the Amazon mollies resulted from a sexual-reproduction event involving two different species of fish, when an Atlantic molly (P. mexicana) first mated with a Sailfin molly 100,000 to 200,000 years ago. About 50 vertebrates are known to use asexual reproduction … Shop recommended products from Molly's Artistry on Amazon.com. The discovery in 1932 of a fish called the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa) debunked the theory that asexual vertebrates could not exist. As there are no males of this species, the female must mate with males of a related species. Enjoy! [7] Asexuality, or the ability to reproduce as an individual, is rare in the animal kingdom. Amazon uses these product IDs to identify the exact item you’re selling. “This study caps an intensive, collaborative study, marking the first glimpse of the genomic features of an asexual vertebrate and setting up a platform for future molecular, cellular and developmental work in this interesting species,” says Michael Lynch, director of the Biodesign Center for Mechanisms of Evolution at Arizona State University. “It seems to have some advantages that we see in species that reproduce sexually and other advantages normally seen in species that produce offspring nonsexually, such as large population sizes.”. In this study, we surveyed the MHC diversity of the asexual amazon molly (Poecilia formosa) and one of its sexual ancestors, the sailfin molly (P. latipinna), which lives in the same habitat. So although the Amazon molly has thrived for thousands of years, it remains resistant to giving away its genomic secrets—for now. The Amazon molly has flourished by defying nature’s odds to reproduce asexually, cloning themselves by duping the male fish of another species to waste their germplasm While the Amazon molly adopted an atypical mode of reproduction in borrowing sperm from males of a related species, Schartl says there is another asexual fish that goes one step further. Asexual reproduction consists of one set of DNA. The Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa) is one of the few asexual vertebrates. Reproduction happens by gynogenesis. Scientists have long theorized that clones, by failing to purge harmful mutations, should experience decay in the genome and eventual extinction over generations. In other words, the fish’s genes evolved along with the its surroundings, rather than stagnated. “It appears the stars aligned for this species,” says first author Wesley C. Warren, an assistant director at the McDonnell Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Instead, the babies are basically clones. We found that the asexual molly has polymorphic MHC loci despite its clonal reproduction, yet not as polymorphic as the sexual species. This results in clones of the mother being produced en masse. The Amazon molly has flourished by defying nature’s odds to reproduce asexually, cloning themselves by duping the male fish of another species to waste their germplasm Females steal the entire genome of their host males, keep it for one generation and then throw it out again Source: Washington University in St. Louis, Original Study You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. They technically mate with males in a similar species, and the sperm from the male does pierce the female ovum—but then the Amazon molly’s eggs destroy any trace of male genes and the cloning process begins. The same has happened with some amphibians. Amazon Molly Image: Manfred Schartl/ TAMU One thing you might think about asexual reproduction is that it’s bad for genetic fitness. It may be that the Amazon molly’s evolutionary process hasn’t played out long enough yet, in which case it’s setting something of a record, according to the study. In animals, parthenogenesis means development of an embryo from an unfertilized egg cell. Other all-female species include the New Mexi… The finding by a team from Washington University St Louis is surprising given that asexual reproduction is assumed to cause genomes to decay. THE AMAZON molly, a small fish from the rivers of Central and South America, is one of the few species that appears to have rid itself of the need to reproduce sexually. The Amazon Molly claims this sperm from P.latipinna, P. Mexicana, or P. latipunctata, which are closely related Molly fish. “It may be that the Amazon molly has the best of both worlds,” says Manfred Schartl, professor and chair of biochemistry at the University of Wurzburg. That’s uncommon, as many other fish have evolved to lose organs they stopped needing. To initiate embryogenesis, however, Amazon mollies require sperm from the males of one of two closely related, but sexually reproducing, species sha About 50 vertebrates are known to use asexual reproduction including fish, amphibians and reptiles. It was a sensation when the Amazon molly was the first asexual vertebrate discovered in 1932," Schartl said. The researchers discovered that the Amazon molly resulted from a sexual reproduction event involving two different species of fish, when an Atlantic molly first mated with a Sailfin molly 100,000 to 200,000 years ago.

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